What I Would’ve Told My Daughter If I Knew What to Say Back Then (2017)

12:31 minutes, color

 

What I Would Have Told My Daughter If I Knew What To Say Back Then features the filmmaker talking to over 13 years of home videos in an imagined conversation with her daughter’s younger years. The filmmaker’s failed coming out when her child was only 3 years old inspired the initial concept for this experimental documentary.

 

Screenings
  • Hanoi International Queer Film Week (Hanoi, Vietnam 2017)
  • Dyke Drama Film Festival 2017 (Perth, Australia 2017)
  • CineMakulay Film Festival 2017 (Manila, Philippines 2017)
  • Taiwan International Queer Film Festival (Taiwan, 2017)
  • Salzburg Global LGBT Forum (Salzburg, Austria 2017)
  • Asterisco Festival Internacional de Cine LGBTIQ (Buenos Aires, Argentina 2017)
  • Miss-en-Scene at the Grrrl Gang Anniversary (Manila, Philippines 2018)
  • Pink Shorts at the Manila Biennale (Manila, Philippines 2018)

 

Press kit

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Slay (2017)

52:56 minutes, color

 

Slay features the story of Floyd Scott Tiogangco, a homosexual trans-androgynous gender-queer Filipino performance artist. He is often judged and denied entry to public vehicles and establishments just because of his unique sense of style. This documentary explores how gender expression is also grounds for discrimination in the Philippines, and how the idea of sexual orientation often comes with a boxed expectation of how a person’s gender expression should be.

 

Screenings
  • Hanoi International Queer Film Week (Hanoi, Vietnam 2017)
  • Bahagi: Mga Kwento at Kanta sa Ilalim ng Bahaghari (Manila, Philippines 2017)
  • Viet Duc High school and iSEE Institute (Hanoi, Vietnam 2017)
  • Far Eastern University (Manila, Philippines 2017)
  • University of the Philippines (Manila, Philippines 2017)
  • Asterisco Festival Internacional de Cine LGBTIQ (Buenos Aires, Argentina 2017)
  • Queer Asia Film Festival (London, United Kingdom 2018)

 

Press kit

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White TransLady (in production)

A transwoman faces yet another struggle as she is discriminated in the afterlife.

 

director’s statement

I have always had a hunger to make a narrative that would talk about the struggles of LGBTs and there has always been the consciousness that I don’t want it to be presented typically.

 

The genre is a mix of drama and dark comedy presented in very surreal storytelling. There are flashbacks but merely glimpses on the past, without words. The characters are Philippine mythical creatures locked in a carnival in the afterlife. This is their purgatory – this is where they will stay day in and day out, drinking coffee and smoking before their shifts. Their main goal is to haunt the people who have caused their deaths to get justice and crossover to a happier place. The film mirrors a society of horrors – how we veer away from and immediately hate the things or people we don’t understand. I want to emphasize how acceptance (and not tolerance) is the key for crossing over – for breaking through, for having life after death.

 

The choice of the horror aesthetics and surreal characterization for a story with an underlying drama plot was made with the hope that an issue this personal could also reach universal understanding and would be relatable to people of different orientations. This is a peek at a transwoman’s struggles but also an exposition that as humans we share the same sentiments, the same heartbreaks, the same joys, and the same hopes. The dark humor aims to hopefully make the film more powerful and leave us asking ourselves who the joke is on, or if there was actually a joke in the first place. The film also offers a reflection on the definition of a family – that it is not always biological and sometimes you can find a family in the most unlikely places. I want the LGBT people to realize through this film that the world can be cruel most of the time but there will always be an ally who will be willing to hold your hand.

 

While the film has a death perspective, it is also about beginnings and change. It is about how we all die tiny deaths in our lives but it does not mean it’s the end. In a way, White TransLady is a reflection of my struggles as a lesbian mom and this story will forever haunt me until I finally put this out to the world.

 

Hapag (2017)

2:49 minutes, color

 

Hapag (dining table) explores the emotional journey of the people widowed and the family left behind by the people who were killed as part of the war on drugs. The film shows how dining tables in grassroots areas are stained by blood due to extra-judicial killings. This film is the filmmaker’s personal commentary on the ongoing war on drugs in the Philippines.

 

SCREENINGS
  • CineResbak (Manila, Philippines, 2017)
  • 14th IAWRT Asian Women’s Film Festival (Delhi, India 2018)

Intercourse of Words (2016)

5:10 minutes, color

 

This intimate piece features clips of the filmmaker and her partner as they are making love. Backed with sensual music and poetry narration, this collaborative piece aims to prove that poetry can touch someone where hands couldn’t.

 

Intercourse of Words is part of Cha Roque’s PeliTula project. PeliTula comes from the Filipino words pelikula (film), and tula (poetry). This project aims to present poetry through filming of words; through the combination of visual images and narrated poems that will make the viewer sit and open himself to the experience. It is putting together two elements that would provide the viewer a full meal, from the power of text, to the spark of imagination, to visual connections and metaphors. Film is a visual art form and poetry is more on the abstract world of thought and feeling rather than the literal world of things.
PeliTula takes on the marriage of the two as an art form.

 

SCREENINGS
  • Queerception: Queer Arts Festival (Manila, Philippines 2016)
  • Queer Film Screening (Bangkok, Thailand 2016)

Dead Rays (2014)

2:12 minutes, color

 

This is for stars that will never dim. Dead Rays is made as a celebration of countless infinities.

 

Dead Rays is part of Cha Roque’s PeliTula project. PeliTula comes from the Filipino words pelikula (film), and tula (poetry). This project aims to present poetry through filming of words; through the combination of visual images and narrated poems that will make the viewer sit and open himself to the experience. It is putting together two elements that would provide the viewer a full meal, from the power of text, to the spark of imagination, to visual connections and metaphors. Film is a visual art form and poetry is more on the abstract world of thought and feeling rather than the literal world of things.
PeliTula takes on the marriage of the two as an art form.

 

SCREENINGS
  • Queerception: Queer Arts Festival (Manila, Philippines 2016)
  • Pauses and Pulses Video Art Exchange (Marrakech Biennale, Morocco 2016)